“Our collective work is particularly important in challenging or supplementing the dominant epistemic archives of colonial Britain…”

...DH for me is a networked process that always inherently, when not explicitly, pedagogical. It focuses more on the creation rather than memorization of archives, and also compels us to think creatively about literacy and textually in the 21st century. Our collective work is particularly important in challenging or supplementing the dominant epistemic archives of colonial Britain. Because of its violent suppression of indigenous languages, customs, cultures, traditions, genders, sexualities, and other aspects of South Asian cultures that lend to our current understandings of xenophobic tendencies around the globe, our work in DHAI and will allied organizations is crucial and timely. My current research draws support from the DHAI community as it harnesses and explores these recent tensions around the notion of “digital homes” in contemporary India.

Doing digital humanities in India … must involve a renewed engagement with the politics of humanities knowledge…

Doing digital humanities in India may not only be a matter of reconfiguring humanities methods and concerns to address digital objects of study, and of making digital methods to study objects of humanities practices. It must involve a renewed engagement with the politics of humanities knowledge in India, and potentially an engagement that is attuned to the questions of ‘digital’ mediation...

“I see DH as an inherently pedagogical site…”

I do not find the inherent fluidity in the terms that have preceded (and in some cases continue to exist simultaneously with) DH, such as Humanities Computing, problematic in the least. My first exposure to the world of DH was through an act of archiving syllabi in the “Center for Literary Computing” at West Virginia University (WVU). This (apparently mundane) task of collecting syllabi for all the different courses that have been taught in the Department of Literary and Cultural Studies at WVU was aimed at creating/making a knowledgebase for pedagogical purposes. For me it represents the finest potential of the digital in the humanities and vice versa: representing knowledge as accessible through the use of technology. Not surprisingly, I see DH as an inherently pedagogical site...