Doing digital humanities in India … must involve a renewed engagement with the politics of humanities knowledge…

Doing digital humanities in India may not only be a matter of reconfiguring humanities methods and concerns to address digital objects of study, and of making digital methods to study objects of humanities practices. It must involve a renewed engagement with the politics of humanities knowledge in India, and potentially an engagement that is attuned to the questions of ‘digital’ mediation...

“Our interest is in looking at how the digital can be useful in helping rethink Humanities research and teaching in India…”

As far as Digital Humanities in India is concerned, our projects certainly fall under that broad umbrella category that we have pitched for DH. We also train our undergraduate students in DH in a gen-ed course run by the department of English. In the past, we have invited scholars and industry personalities from all over the world to deliver lectures. As part of our efforts, we are more interested in broader collaborative projects and reaching out to potential partners across institutions and outside academia rather than individual projects. Besides theorizing about DH or working on projects, our interest is in looking at how the digital can be useful in helping rethink Humanities research and teaching in India, in general. Also, we are interested in dialogues with the government about recognising DH as a discipline that can be taught as part of university curricula and the skillsets of which are formally recognised by the UGC and the DST...

“I see DH as an inherently pedagogical site…”

I do not find the inherent fluidity in the terms that have preceded (and in some cases continue to exist simultaneously with) DH, such as Humanities Computing, problematic in the least. My first exposure to the world of DH was through an act of archiving syllabi in the “Center for Literary Computing” at West Virginia University (WVU). This (apparently mundane) task of collecting syllabi for all the different courses that have been taught in the Department of Literary and Cultural Studies at WVU was aimed at creating/making a knowledgebase for pedagogical purposes. For me it represents the finest potential of the digital in the humanities and vice versa: representing knowledge as accessible through the use of technology. Not surprisingly, I see DH as an inherently pedagogical site...